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I’ve had this Harry Potter inspired project on the back-burner for the last few months, but with the new (and last!) movie coming out very soon I knew now was the time to tackle it.

And so, may I present, straight from my sewing room Madam Malkin’s: Robes for All Occasions: Gryffindor school robes!

I used this tutorial on BurdaSyle and although I found them a bit of a challenge to put them together, I am pretty happy with the results.

I used broadcloth for its affordability, and found the Gryffindor crest on Etsy.

If you are thinking of making some yourself, definitely read through all of the comments on the tutorial, as they were really helpful in drafting and cutting out the pattern.  Next time (oh yes, there will be a next time, I still have at least one more to make!) despite the extra fabric it will take, I think I will line the whole front, and not just 4 inches as the pattern calls for.  This was the first time I have used seam tape and I wasn’t really happy with it. 

I can’t wait to hand these robes over to their owner tomorrow! 

Harry Potter Fun!

Your robes are on and you are ready for a magical adventure.  Here are some magical ideas I’ve collected from around the web.  (Most of these I used to create a magical day at Hogwarts for my students, but the kitchen creations would be appreciated by fans of all ages.)

1.  Find or make yourself an owl and send letters by “owl post” in invisible ink.  (I was lucky enough to find a beautiful snowy owl stuffy at a yard sale, but several years ago I made a pompom owl for my mother as part of  Harry Potter-themed birthday present, that, of course, had to arrive by owl post.)  Or write letters in regular ink, or with calligraphy pens,  on “scrolls” (receipt or adding-machine tape works great for this!)

2.  Spend a day taking classes at Hogwarts! 

  • Herbology: create magical plants of your own with art supplies, or use your imagination and spend some time in the garden planting and caring for “magical” plants. 
  • Potions: think cooking or science experiments (magic mud is a favourite), or write your own
  • Transfiguration: play a game of charades
  • Charms: create your own spells
  • and if you have enough people, don’t forget to play a game of Quidditch (I have played a modified version with as few as seven people)

3.  Cook up some favourite Hogwarts treats by following some fun recipes on Heather Bailey’s site: Chocolate Wands, Butterbeer and mini broomsticks, Cockroach Clusters, and of course you could always make chocolate frogs or pretend any jelly beans are of the “Bertie Botts Every Flavoured” variety.   

Enjoy!   And remember: “Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus”

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I’ve been dreaming again.  Not the kind that you have at night (although I certainly have my fair share of those, too!) but the kind of dreams that make you think about all the exciting and wonderful things you could do.

This is nothing new to me, being somewhat of a “dreamer” by nature.  I would need several lifetimes to act on all the ideas for projects that run through my head on a daily basis.  Many of them come in and out and I never think of them again.

But sometimes I have an idea that seems to stick in my head long enough to start looking less like a dream, and more like a possibility.

After attending several online classes recently, I have been inspired to think about setting up an online sewing class.  I love sewing and I love sharing all that I have learned with others (I’m a teacher, after all!).   And with somewhat serendipitous timing, Crissy Heron, at Indie BizChicks.com, is offering a chance to win a spot in her course on how to teach an online class.   (Her site is full of great information on running a business!  If that’s your thing, be sure to check it out!)

So…I’m putting this idea out there, and we’ll see what happens!

What kind of crazy/awesome/exciting ideas are you pondering today?

 

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You might remember from last year that once a year my students get to choose their own topic of study for a month.  This year the winner was something they called “Ooshy, Gooshy, Take Home Science.”   So this month I have been up to my elbows in goo each day as we explore the messiest science experiments I can find, and at the end of the day there is always something ooshy or gooshy for them to take home with them. 

On one of our theme days I decided to teach the students about kitchen chemistry.  We had already learned about suspensions in a previous science experiment (a solution where solid molecules are suspended in a liquid) so making our own butter seemed like a good extension of this.

It was a hit!   (With the students and the grown-ups in the room.)  It was fun to make, and delicious spread on our home-made pizza dough  (we studied how leavening agents work) with a little garlic and cheese as homemade garlic fingers. 

You can make your own butter, too.  Here’s how:

Start with whipping cream and a clean glass jar with a tight-fitting lid.  (The bigger the jar, the harder work this is going to be so start small.)

Fill the jar 1/3 full of cream.

Now shake!

This takes a lot of shaking, and if there are kids doing it, a lot of “is it done yet?  Can we look at it?  If you stop to look, you will see that it is getting thicker, but it’s not butter yet.

Put some good shaking music on to renew the motivation to keep shaking!  In my classroom we enjoyed shaking around to “Philadelphia Chickens” from the Sandra Boynton CD of the same title.

Eventually it is going to get so thick that you feel like you can’t shake anymore.  Trust me, it can be done. 

On the outside the jar is all white.  On the inside you will find you’ve made whipping cream.  Yummy, but not the goal for the day.  Put the lid back on and shake some more. 

You will know your shaking is paying off when you start to see little bits of clear glass again.  Keep shaking.

As the cream turns into butter and buttermilk the sides of the jar will become clear again and you will be able to see the butter starting to gather.  Keep shaking until you have a nice clump of butter and some milky white liquid (the buttermilk)

Open the jar and pour off the buttermilk (you can save it for baking if you like.)  Rinse your butter with cold water and transfer to a serving dish.

You have just made your very own butter!  (and enjoyed a good arm workout, too!)  Enjoy!

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An Apron for a Teacher

“Take chances, make mistakes and get messy!”  Ms. Frizzle of “Magic School Bus” fame likes to say.  Although I don’t own a bus with magical powers, and I try to stay away from themed outfits, Ms. Frizzle and I share a very similar educational philosophy – children learn better when they are right in the thick of things, experiencing and learning for themselves.

And so, my classroom can be a messy place. 

I have a huge white lab coat that I often wear that has been splattered with a rainbow of colours and decorated with rainbow coloured buttons (ok…so maybe sometimes Ms Frizzle and I dress in a similar fashion), but it can be hot to wear and I don’t always need full-body coverage. 

So when Abby of Sew much Ado asked me to test her Mommy and Mia Apron Pattern, I knew exactly what I was going to make the apron for.

And I already had the perfect fabric.

Meet my new teaching apron!

And the cute bow at the back.

The pattern was really easy to follow and I am super-happy with the finished product!  She has so many diagrams and explains everything so clearly that a seasoned sewer could probably whip one up in a few hours and a confident beginner could probably tackle it too.  The pattern also includes girls sizes so that matching aprons can be made for moms and daughters – too cute!

The pattern is currently available in PDF format on the Sew Much Ado web-site and will soon be available as a paper pattern.  Abby also created the wonderful Ruby Lou doll pattern which I made last year.   

Now I think I need to come up with something wonderfully messy to do when my students come back to school next Monday…..  🙂

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One of my favourite things about being a teacher is all of the great children’s literature I get to read.  I love reading out loud to my students and especially enjoy seeing them fall in love with a book that I love too.  I have a pile of best-loved books for each grade level I have taught (everything from preschool to Grade 5) and love discovering new titles. 

Many books are best for certain age groups, but once in a while a book comes along that seems to have wide-range appeal, a book that is enjoyed by children of all ages, and speaks to them all in different ways (including the adults!)

Pete the Cat is one of those books.  It is a simple story, but with lots of fun repetition, engaging illustrations and a great message. 

Pete the Cat has a pair of brand new white shoes.  He loves them so much that he walks around singing a song about them.  But as he is walking he accidentally steps into some bright red strawberries.  His brand new white shoes aren’t white anymore, they’re red!  But does Pete cry?  Not him!  He just accepts the change and makes a new song.  “I love my red shoes……” 

Young kids will just enjoy the musicality of the book – especially if you also listen to the author telling the story himself!   But for my seven and eight-year olds it was also a great lesson in having a positive attitude in the face of small challenges and disappointments (like not getting the tidy-up job they wanted, or the colour paper they were hoping for, or having to switch to outdoor shoes yet again)   This book was read over and over (and over!) again in my classroom and it is not uncommon to hear my students walking down the hall or cleaning the classroom singing their song…..”I love to sweep the floor….” or “I love my outdoor shoes…..”

As an adult it reminds me that although I cannot control what challenges and disappointments will come my way during the course of a day, I can control how I react to them.  I want to choose to just keep on going while singing my song a lot more often.  It’s a much happier way to live. 

Don’t you love it when you are teaching something to others, and you learn the lesson too?

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A Little Halloween Fun

With Halloween only a few days away, tomorrow will be our Halloween celebration at school. 

I have a few fun surprises for my students tomorrow, including some pumpkin and spider inspired math games and a monster design lab in the afternoon.

And they are so excited about wearing their costumes to school!  So excited, that they convinced someone else to dress up.

And no…it wasn’t me (I didn’t need convincing.)

Meet Harold.  A childhood friend of hubby’s who made an appearance in my classroom as Dr. Shrinkle, the amazing mathematician who made patterns shrink with his magic shrinking suitcase.  It was love at first sight and my students have been showering him with so much love and affection that he thinks he is a superstar.  

And yesterday they convinced him to dress up as a pumpkin. 

He’s pretty cute, don’t you think?

I will be attending the festivities as the dormouse from Alice in Wonderland (all of the teachers at my school are going as characters from this book, with minimal costume pieces the students will have to guess what story we are all from).

The resident cat is modelling my ears and tail. 

This is one time of year when I am extra grateful for my sewing machine (and glue gun!)

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Every year the students in my class have one month where the get to choose, as a class, what they would like to learn about.  I am always amazed by the wide range of topics they come up with (my Grade 1/2’s had World War 2, Crystals and Gems, God, and Circus Performing among some of the final contenders….) and I always enjoy the process of learning something new together.

After much debate my current students finally decided that they wanted to learn about the ice age so we have spent most of May and the beginning of June learning about saber-tooth tigers, wooly mammoths, glaciers, cave paintings and primitive hunting techniques.  My students have begged to watch the movie “Ice Age” as a way to celebrate all that we have learned but as our school has a no movie policy I had to come up with something that seemed equally as celebratory.

So I decided we should make our own ice cream

I have never made my own ice cream before.

Google came to my rescue again and I found directions for making ice cream using two baggies and some ice.  It seemed simple but I have learned from hard experience that I need to try everything myself before attempting it with my students.   So it was that I was making ice cream in my kitchen early Sunday morning.  And then I got to eat ice cream on an early Sunday morning (teaching does have its job perks!) 

This is super easy to do, and really fun! 

To begin, put 1/2 cup milk (I used full fat milk), 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1 Tbsp sugar into a ziplock sandwich bag and seal tightly.

Then fill a large ziplock bag about half-full of ice and add 6 Tbsp of salt (I used coarse pickling salt – a lot of internet sites said to use rock salt but I couldn’t find any and the coarse salt worked great!)  Nest your little bag of milk into the ice and salt mixture and seal the big bag.

Now set your timer for 5 minutes and massage your bag, moving the ice over and around your bag of milk.  I found it easiest to wrap the bag in a tea towel so that my hands didn’t get so cold and then I just massaged away!  After five minutes are up, open your bag.  The little bag of milk should be cold and solid.  (If it’s not – a bit more massaging in the ice should do the trick).

Use your towel to wipe off the outside of the little bag (you don’t want to get salt into your ice cream) and then spoon the contents into a little dish and enjoy!

It’s not quite what you would get from an ice cream parlour but it’s cold and delicious and you made it yourself – what could be better than that?

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